Marietta, Georgia, January 23, 2019 – Life University’s NeuroLIFE Institute recently concluded its extensive research on the NeuroSage – a video game type of equipment developed to increase brain function in individuals with neurological deficiencies. After testing this treatment modality, the NeuroLIFE Institute has found that it is not only safe to use, but it has proven effective in increasing brain function, such as cognitive and balance parameters, in said individuals.

NeuroSage was created by Kyle Daigle, D.C., who built the software company SNA Biotech so that he could release this treatment method to help rehabilitate those with brain and nervous system disorders. The NeuroSage, part of new, leading-edge technology referred to as digital medicine, is basically a video game designed to improve the brain through the very specific use of frequencies and colors that are advantageous in the treatment of certain neurological conditions – and has been found safe and highly effective by the NeuroLIFE Institute.

Dr. Michael A. Longyear, D.C., DACNB, CCSP, Director of Applied Clinical Neuroscience at NeuroLIFE Institute, says, “The most substantial reason we started researching and testing this technology is the need for new and different treatment modalities for neurological deficiencies, such as concussion, ADHD and neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease. Since video games are so prevalent in today’s society, several companies created some that are designed to increase brain function, and the NeuroLIFE Institute researched the equipment and has shown its safe and effective use for this purpose.”

If you have any questions regarding this breakthrough technology, please email Life University’s NeuroLIFE Institute at Michael.Longyear@LIFE.edu.

And if you would like to know more about the leading-edge technologies that Life University’s NeuroLIFE Institute uses to restore and optimize brain and neurologic function, please visit www.NeuroLIFEInstitute.com.

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